• E-safety

E Safety Guide for Parents

Internet Safety Advice from CEOP

  • Help your children to understand that they should never give out personal details to online friends they do not know offline.
  • Explain to your children what information about them is personal: i.e. email address, mobile number, school name, sports club, arrangements for meeting up with friends and any pictures or videos of themselves, their family or friends. Small pieces of information can easily be pieced together to form a comprehensive insight in to their lives and daily activities.
  • Make your children aware that they need to think carefully about the information and pictures they post on their profiles. Inform them that once published online, anyone can change or share these images of them.
  • It can be easy to forget that the internet is not a private space, and as result sometimes young people engage in risky behaviour online. Advise your children not to post any pictures, videos or information on their profiles, or in chat rooms, that they would not want a parent or carer to see.
  • If your child receives spam or junk email and texts, remind them never to believe their contents, reply to them or use them.
  • It's not a good idea for your child to open files that are from people they don't know. They won't know what they contain—it could be a virus, or worse - an inappropriate image or film.
  • Help your child to understand that some people lie online and that therefore it's better to keep online mates online. They should never meet up with any strangers without an adult they trust.
  • Always keep communication open for a child to know that it's never too late to tell someone if something makes them feel uncomfortable.

Some Simple Ways to Keep Children Safe Online

  • Get to know your child’s online habits. Children are inquisitive. They will look to explore the internet as much as they do the real world. Knowing the sites they go to, the people they meet there and what they do will help to keep children safe.
  • Stay alert to any sudden changes in mood or appearance, or to any major change in habits or to increased secretiveness. These are often tell-tale signs that something is not right.
  • Spend some time surfing the internet yourself. The more that you know about the internet, the better able you are, in turn, to help your child navigate around it without coming to any harm.
  • Install internet filtering software showing a Child Safety Online Kitemark on your computer.  Filtering products with a Kitemark have been independently tested to provide a simple and effective means of support to parents, helping to ensure that a child’s online experience is a safe one.  The Kitemark scheme is sponsored by the Home Office and Ofcom.
  • Be aware of professional sources of help (see useful websites).

Here is some advice about staying safe online:

The Internet is an exciting place with endless opportunities for fun, games and education. It can also be an extremely dangerous place for teenagers unless it is used properly.

Please take/encourage your children to take the following steps to make sure they are safe online:

  • Make sure all laptops and computers are used in a communal area where the screen can be seen by all.
  • Ask your child to charge any mobile devices (phones, Ipods, Ipads etc) downstairs and NOT in bedrooms.

Social Networking and On-line Gaming:

 
  • Make sure the privacy settings are set to “friends only” in the “Account settings”
  • NEVER include the date of birth, address or school name in the “About me” section
  • Children should only add or accept people they know in the real world – NOT friends of friends or people they have met online
  • Only post photos that you would be happy to show your gran! Be careful posting photos showing your school badge, the outside of your house/school
  •  The best tip is to talk to your child and become involved in their online world.  Ask questions about what they are doing and who they are talking to
  • ONLY accept people you know in the “real world”
  • Explain to your child that people lie online and can be mean
  • Tell your child never to accept an invitation to move to a chat room with someone they have met while online gaming

Cyber bullying

If your child is subjected to any form of cyber bullying:

  • Tell them not to reply
  • Keep a record of the abuse for future investigation
  • Tell someone in school or report the problem to the police

Webcams

Be aware of the information that is visible via the webcam – i.e. names on certificates, posters of favourite pop stars

Extra information about keeping your child safe online or reporting a problem can be found on our Useful Links page.

Gang Awareness

The Concerned Parent’s Toolbox – 120 Tools and Tricks to Protect Your Kids

http://www.safeteens.com/- this site is nice because it has a lot of info and instructions for implementing them. It’s a good way to get facts in Steph’s face that aren’t debatable since the info is mainly sourced and excerpted from other sites and articles.

https://www.budgetdirect.com.au/blog/digital-safety-staying-safe-online.html- this site is good because it has a lot of quick information about major scams and dangers online. I like it because Steph thinks she’d never fall victim to a scam, but she had no idea half of the ones listed existed.

http://teenshealth.org/en/teens/internet-safety.html- this site also has been a good one for Steph, it’s a bit older looking but it has articles are on tons of topics written for teens. She gets important info about the internet and sometimes I see her on it reading articles about other issues, so overall a pretty successful one I think.